The Dump of my mind

fuck life let's just sleep all day

1,205 notes


"I’ve never seen anybody change so much in front of a camera as Audrey. In life, you’d think ‘How is she going to get through the day or even the hour?’ Her hands were shaking, she’s smoking too much, she’s worried, she’s being kind of desperately nice to everybody, she’s so fragile… But between the time she stepped in front of the camera and you said ‘Action!’, something happened. She pulled it together. A kind of strength through vulnerability - strength like an iron butterfly… The performance was true, never weak, always strong and clear. It was an amazing thing to watch, this professional completely in charge of her instrument without even thinking about it. I think it was all second nature." 
Peter Bogdanovich

"I’ve never seen anybody change so much in front of a camera as Audrey. In life, you’d think ‘How is she going to get through the day or even the hour?’ Her hands were shaking, she’s smoking too much, she’s worried, she’s being kind of desperately nice to everybody, she’s so fragile… But between the time she stepped in front of the camera and you said ‘Action!’, something happened. She pulled it together. A kind of strength through vulnerability - strength like an iron butterfly… The performance was true, never weak, always strong and clear. It was an amazing thing to watch, this professional completely in charge of her instrument without even thinking about it. I think it was all second nature." 

Peter Bogdanovich

(Source: missingaudrey, via sansasnark)

15,370 notes

malformalady:

Japanese farmers have been experimenting with growing watermelon in shapes other than the traditional round or oblong shapes. Hirochi Kimura and his wife spent three years perfecting the art of growing these tokens of affection on their farm in Kumamoto, Japan. They say the shape symbolizes “their passion for farming and their affection for each other.”

malformalady:

Japanese farmers have been experimenting with growing watermelon in shapes other than the traditional round or oblong shapes. Hirochi Kimura and his wife spent three years perfecting the art of growing these tokens of affection on their farm in Kumamoto, Japan. They say the shape symbolizes “their passion for farming and their affection for each other.”

(via zoealex)